Facing increased demand for computer science jobs, the country is preparing students with help from Minna no Code.

Each year, domestic and international tourists descend upon the 1,300-year-old Yamanaka Onsen resort — about six hours west of Tokyo — to visit its hot springs, which are said to ease muscle and joint pain. But visitors often find it’s not easy to maintain a comfortable hot spring temperature.

A student* in an Ishikawa prefecture school decided to use her programming class to develop a hot spring temperature regulation system. “By combining a temperature sensor and a heater, we created a mechanism that automatically adjusts the temperature of hot water according to the outside air at that time,” she said.

Students take part in a programming class at The Kaga Clubhouse, established by Minna no Code and the municipality of Kaga, Ishikawa (Photo courtesy of Minna no Code)


We really couldn’t do this without you

Many schools and classrooms have looked very different this year than they have in years past, but one thing holds constant: the passion and dedication of all the teachers who work hard every single day to educate our students, no matter the circumstances.

During this year’s Teacher Appreciation Week, we want to recognize and thank the many thousands of teachers here in the U.S. and around the world who have overcome significant challenges to do the world’s most important job. …


How Code.org helped one Malaysian student discover his passion for computer science—and giving.

Christopher Raj Victor didn’t realize he had won a prize at first.

The 12-year-old living in Selangor, Malaysia participated in an informal math competition organized by a friend’s mother at a local playground, and tied for second place. He was asked to come collect his winnings, and rode his bike uphill to retrieve his award. His prize for solving 20/25 math problems correctly was 10 Malaysian ringgits, or roughly $2.50 U.S. dollars.

Christopher poses with Code.org swag. (Photo courtesy of Christopher Raj Victor)

His first thought was to donate his newly-earned winnings, but to where? As a Formula 1 racing fan, Christopher admired a fundraiser organized by a French driver named…


Code.org will launch this free AP CSA curriculum for all schools starting in the 2022–23 school year.

In late February, we announced that Code.org is developing a first-of-its-kind curriculum for the AP Computer Science A (CSA) Java programming course with an intentional focus on increasing student access, participation, and diversity.

With cross-sector support, Code.org is developing a first-of-its-kind Computer Science A (CSA) Java programming curriculum designed with equity at its core. (Photo by Code.org)

Today, we are thrilled to announce incredible momentum behind this effort, with support from 7 state governments, 17 corporations, and 14 higher education institutions supporting us in creating the new curriculum. …


Last month the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) gave the Turing Award, the most prestigious award in computer science, to professors Jeffrey Ullman and Alfred Vaino Aho. Code.org promoted this award on social media to our followers.

We have since learned that professor Ullman has a long history of discriminatory comments against Iranians.

Ullman very recently deleted his “Answers to All Questions Iranian” in which he refers to Iranians as “Islamic terrorists.” He also dismisses the historic plight of Native Americans as “the way things happen.” Despite complaints, he kept these statements public for 15 years.

Ullman also wrote, “I…


Since it was launched in 2014, Programma il Futuro has helped turn Italy into a powerhouse of computer science teaching.

“I’ve always appreciated the beauty of the place where I live,” says Rosalba Ciaffone, a science teacher in Istituto Comprensivo Joseph Stella, an elementary school of Muro Lucano, a town with breathtaking views in the less prosperous southern part of Italy. “But it’s a little far from everything and everybody.”

As Italy reopened schools after being hard-hit by COVID19, the pandemic didn’t stop Ms. Ciaffone’s students from participating in the Hour of Code in 2020 (Photo courtesy of Rosalba Ciaffone)

Perched atop a ravine, with picturesque houses built on terraces, Muro Lucano has seen its share of history in its eventful existence, including earthquakes and wars. Yet under Ms. …


Julio Reyes Copello, Producer and Founder of Miami Art House, and top Latin artists like singer-songwriter Joy, will join for a 4-episode series of ‘Hora del Código En Vivo’, or Hour of Code Live.

What does recording music and coding an app have in common? Both processes rely on creativity and technology, and the end result can appeal to millions and connect all types of people from around the world.

That is why Miami Art House is the latest partner to join Code.org’s global Hour of Code campaign to inspire students around the world to learn computer science. The music label has welcomed many of the most important names in the industry, including Jennifer Lopez, Miguel, Will Smith, Nicky Jam, Pablo Alborán, amongst others.

Founded by Julio Reyes Copello, Miami Art House has become…


In honor of Women’s History Month, we’re profiling women in technology throughout the month of March. We hope sharing these stories will encourage girls and young women to start or continue studying computer science!

Our Women’s History Month series is coming to a close today with a final interview with Anne Dinning. Anne received her PhD in computer science from New York University, and then started working at D. E. Shaw group, an investment firm based in New York City, in 1990. Now, she’s part of the firm’s executive team. From finance to farming, computer science can be applied to any field!

Let’s hear from Anne.

Photo courtesy of Anne Dinning.

Can you tell us where you work and what you do in your current role?

I currently work at the D. E. Shaw group, an investment firm based in New York City. Back when the firm started in 1988, we were one of…


In honor of Women’s History Month, we’re profiling women in technology throughout the month of March. We hope sharing these stories will encourage girls and young women to start or continue studying computer science!

Today we’re hearing from Jaleesa Trapp, a second-year PhD student in MIT’s Media Lab from Tacoma, Wash. who is also a STEM/computer science teacher. Jaleesa works with the Lifelong Kindergarten research group—the same group that created Scratch—and her research focuses on designing equitable and playful technology experiences with and for youth. Take it away, Jaleesa!

Photo courtesy of Jaleesa Trapp.

Can you tell us where you work and what you do in your current role?

I’m a second-year PhD student at the MIT Media Lab with the Lifelong Kindergarten research group (the group that created Scratch). My current focus is designing equitable and playful technology experiences with and for youth. I’m also a STEM Technologies teacher in Tacoma, Wash. In…


In honor of Women’s History Month, we’re profiling women in technology throughout the month of March. We hope sharing these stories will encourage girls and young women to start or continue studying computer science!

You might recognize Sasha’s name from her groundbreaking STEM-focused children’s book, “Sasha Savvy Loves to Code.” Published in 2017, the book tells the story of a 10-year-old African-American girl who decides to take a chance on a computer science summer camp, and the rest is history! Her second book in the series, “Sasha Savvy Starts it Up,” focuses on entrepreneurship.

Sasha is also a keynote speaker who encourages youth to explore educational and career opportunities in STEM. She graduated in 2020 with a degree in Information Systems from Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. Let’s hear from Sasha!

Can you tell us where you work and what you do in your current role?

Currently, I…

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