In June of 2020, when police brutality in the U.S. sparked global protests against racism, Code.org published a post outlining our commitment to support our Black employees, partners, teachers, and students.

We hosted a brainstorm for our entire staff, made a multi-year plan of action, and committed to public updates twice a year. (The January 2021 update is here).

Below are actions we’ve taken at Code.org in the last 6 months towards better supporting our Black Employees Students and Teachers (BEST) plan:

1) Launched a video featuring Black role models to inspire CS students, in partnership with over a dozen nonprofits led by people of color

View on YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn

The video received over 1 million views and 3,000 shares…


Thanks to Fundación Kodea’s work, Chile has impressed the global community when it comes to teaching computer science in the region. Kodea’s campaign has resulted in students developing an oceanic probe to help fishermen and a Braille printer for the visually impaired, among other projects.

*You can read a Spanish version of this story here.

“I am not an expert, but I can solve some problems,” says Constanza Mazzey, 16. A student with a knack for coding, she joined a group at her high school in Coyhaique, a city in southern Chile, that developed an oceanic probe to detect water temperature and fish behavior. The device is intended to help the local fishing industry increase their catch.

Constanza Mazzey (right) with Javiera Aguilar, who won a 2019 digital talent contest for their oceanic probe.
(Photo courtesy of Constanza Mazzey)

“We wanted to create a tool that would allow our community fishermen to see data like temperature changes because their work is based on the species that are…


Today Code.org announced the signing of a licensing agreement with WhiteHat Jr, a premium one-on-one tutoring company that serves over 175,000 students worldwide.

Code.org’s computer science (CS) curriculum and platform will always remain free for educators and organizations. This agreement allows WhiteHat Jr to integrate Code.org’s content and tools into their online tutoring service, enabling students to learn foundational computer science with one of their 11,000 private teachers using the Code.org platform.

Code.org is the largest provider of CS curricula for students, and has built one of the most popular CS education platforms globally. …


After schools shutdown last March, this Nebraska 4th grader discovered a love for programming.

Gracie dreams of being an astrophysicist someday, and she’s starting her journey one line of code at a time.

The 4th grade student from Omaha, Nebraska began learning computer science at home using Code.org when her parents started homeschooling her last March after schools abruptly shut down due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Gracie works on a game at home on her laptop. (Photo courtesy of Gracie’s family)

“I like space stuff!” the 10-year-old says, speaking like a true future astrophysicist. “For a final project, I wanted to make a space invader-type game and started building from there.”

Gracie’s game, called “Earth Defenders,” is impressive from a technical standpoint. Built with 369 lines of code, players…


Facing increased demand for computer science jobs, the country is preparing students with help from Minna no Code.

Each year, domestic and international tourists descend upon the 1,300-year-old Yamanaka Onsen resort — about six hours west of Tokyo — to visit its hot springs, which are said to ease muscle and joint pain. But visitors often find it’s not easy to maintain a comfortable hot spring temperature.

A student* in an Ishikawa prefecture school decided to use her programming class to develop a hot spring temperature regulation system. “By combining a temperature sensor and a heater, we created a mechanism that automatically adjusts the temperature of hot water according to the outside air at that time,” she said.

Students take part in a programming class at The Kaga Clubhouse, established by Minna no Code and the municipality of Kaga, Ishikawa (Photo courtesy of Minna no Code)


We really couldn’t do this without you

Many schools and classrooms have looked very different this year than they have in years past, but one thing holds constant: the passion and dedication of all the teachers who work hard every single day to educate our students, no matter the circumstances.

During this year’s Teacher Appreciation Week, we want to recognize and thank the many thousands of teachers here in the U.S. and around the world who have overcome significant challenges to do the world’s most important job. …


How Code.org helped one Malaysian student discover his passion for computer science—and giving.

Christopher Raj Victor didn’t realize he had won a prize at first.

The 12-year-old living in Selangor, Malaysia participated in an informal math competition organized by a friend’s mother at a local playground, and tied for second place. He was asked to come collect his winnings, and rode his bike uphill to retrieve his award. His prize for solving 20/25 math problems correctly was 10 Malaysian ringgits, or roughly $2.50 U.S. dollars.

Christopher poses with Code.org swag. (Photo courtesy of Christopher Raj Victor)

His first thought was to donate his newly-earned winnings, but to where? As a Formula 1 racing fan, Christopher admired a fundraiser organized by a French driver named…


Code.org will launch this free AP CSA curriculum for all schools starting in the 2022–23 school year.

In late February, we announced that Code.org is developing a first-of-its-kind curriculum for the AP Computer Science A (CSA) Java programming course with an intentional focus on increasing student access, participation, and diversity.

With cross-sector support, Code.org is developing a first-of-its-kind Computer Science A (CSA) Java programming curriculum designed with equity at its core. (Photo by Code.org)

Today, we are thrilled to announce incredible momentum behind this effort, with support from 7 state governments, 17 corporations, and 14 higher education institutions supporting us in creating the new curriculum. …


Last month the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) gave the Turing Award, the most prestigious award in computer science, to professors Jeffrey Ullman and Alfred Vaino Aho. Code.org promoted this award on social media to our followers.

We have since learned that professor Ullman has a long history of discriminatory comments against Iranians.

Ullman very recently deleted his “Answers to All Questions Iranian” in which he refers to Iranians as “Islamic terrorists.” He also dismisses the historic plight of Native Americans as “the way things happen.” Despite complaints, he kept these statements public for 15 years.

Ullman also wrote, “I…


Since it was launched in 2014, Programma il Futuro has helped turn Italy into a powerhouse of computer science teaching.

“I’ve always appreciated the beauty of the place where I live,” says Rosalba Ciaffone, a science teacher in Istituto Comprensivo Joseph Stella, an elementary school of Muro Lucano, a town with breathtaking views in the less prosperous southern part of Italy. “But it’s a little far from everything and everybody.”

As Italy reopened schools after being hard-hit by COVID19, the pandemic didn’t stop Ms. Ciaffone’s students from participating in the Hour of Code in 2020 (Photo courtesy of Rosalba Ciaffone)

Perched atop a ravine, with picturesque houses built on terraces, Muro Lucano has seen its share of history in its eventful existence, including earthquakes and wars. Yet under Ms. …

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Code.org® is dedicated to expanding access to computer science increasing participation by young women and students from other underrepresented groups.

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